Official Demands

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Bullets:

  1. Every UVA employee must be guaranteed a LIVING WAGE under university policy, at least $13.00.
  2. All working members of the UVA community have the right to job security.
  3. All UVA workers must be guaranteed safe, just, and humane working conditions.
  4. The University must allow and facilitate the creation of a Living Wage Oversight Board.
  1.  Cada empleado de UVA debe tener un salario mínimo vital garantizado por las políticas de empleo de la Universidad, no menos de $13.00.
  2. Todos los trabajadores de la comunidad de UVA tienen derecho a estabilidad laboral.
  3. Todos los trabajadores de UVA tienen que tener garantizada seguridad y salud en el trabajo, con condiciones laborales
    justos y humanitarios.
  4. La Universidad tiene que permitir y facilitar en la creación de una Junta de Supervisión del Salario Mínimo Vital.

Short Text:
1. Every UVA employee must be guaranteed a LIVING WAGE under university policy.
This wage can be no less than $13.00 and must be adjusted on an annual basis to comply with the Economic Policy Institute’s regionally-sourced cost-of-living and inflation calculations. The implementation of a living wage must not come at the reduction of any other benefits, including health care. This base wage must be extended not only to direct university employees but also to contract and subcontract employees; the campaign holds that outsourcing core functions does not relieve the University of its obligation to treat employees fairly. UVA must therefore consolidate and make publicly available all data from contractors regarding labor conditions, a right it already reserves in a number of contracts. Contractors who do not meet these requirements will not be eligible.
2. All working members of the UVA community have the right to job security.
In implementing the living wage policy, no jobs or wages will be eliminated or diminished. The University must commit to providing full-time jobs when possible, and part-time or temporary work only when necessary. What the University calls an entry-level wage should be just that: a wage for entry-level employees only. Entry-level wages must not be permanent wages and there must be clear and feasible channels for advancement. A strong community is built by those who share sustained personal investment in it, a goal which can only be achieved by ensuring workers have access to full time and appropriately compensated employment.
3. All UVA workers must be guaranteed safe, just, and humane working conditions.
This includesclearly publicized avenues for reporting wage violations and/or unsafe working conditions. UVA must protect workers’ rights to organize, to speak out about poor working conditions or low wages, and to file grievances without fear of retaliation. The University must also acknowledge the disproportionate number of women and people of color at the bottom of the wage scale. UVA must take concrete steps to address these disparities through the equitable promotion of people of color and women.
4. The University must allow and facilitate the creation of a Living Wage Oversight Board,
an employee organization with oversight responsibilities for ensuring the University’s ongoing commitment to providing a living wage for all employees. This task force will also serve as a resource for workers to report grievances and labor violations without fear of reprisal or retaliation.

9 Responses to Official Demands

  1. [...] mark your calendars for Feb 22- 24 to meet the board of visitors as they gather in Charlottesville more info recent events sponsored by the Cville Workers Action Network- On Wednesday, February 15th a small [...]

  2. [...] I wholeheartedly endorse the living wage campaign at UVA, and I call on anyone who supported my campaign to join the struggle right now and finally win it all once and for all. (click here to see what that means) [...]

  3. Terry Gruber says:

    Total nonsense. Those exceptionally high cost increases will have to be made up in—-*gasp*—higher tuition increases. And I won’t mention reduced productivity of the workforce (just take a look at public works projects—generally, those conducted by nonunion labor come in under budget and are completed in less time. Union labor typically goes over budget and takes as much as a year longer to complete.)

    • Dannah says:

      Thanks for checking out our website. It’s not necessarily the case that instituting a Living Wage will necessitate higher tuition costs; this hasn’t been true across the board at the 22 of the top 25 universities in the US that have already adopted Living Wage policies and practices. Also, for further info on the concerns you raised about worker productivity and other economic considerations, please take a look at our research documents under the Keeping Our Promises tab.

  4. Vicky Smith says:

    G’Day! Livingwageatuva,
    Interesting Thoughts, The adage, ‘Good Fences Make Good Neighbors’ is true for the most part … unless your fence is on someone else’s land.
    Nice One!

  5. anonymous says:

    If you want to look at something check out what part-time workers get. No insurance, no evaluations, no mechanism annual pay/cost of living increase, no sick/personal/vacation time, and no education credits. All of which are things full-time workers have.

  6. Jim Eckland says:

    I support Private companies and other businesses to “Voluntarily” pay good salaries and I really don’t have a problem here as long Federal Legislation isn’t involved. However, $$ doesn’t grow on trees and therefore Jobs can never be guaranteed, nor will Working Conditions ever be perfect. Only when compensation is good are people able to live…buy Health Insuance, cars, etc. Otherwise, citizens embrace “Re-distributive Political Philosophies” which gradually strip Freedom! Since this is a State University, legislation or a ballot Question may be required !!

    • Terry Gruber says:

      Spot on, Jim. If a business (or, university) doesn’t pay a livable wage, they won’t get qualified workers to come work for them. If you want wages to remain “livable”, then folks need to support keeping the labor pool smaller than the number of job opportunities—simple laws of supply and demand. Right now, labor is over-supplied. Why do you suppose….?

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